Adopting Kittens in China!

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For the past two months, we have been greeted every day by two beautiful little balls of fluff, Noodle and Dumpling. Despite not planning on adopting any sort of animal ever, especially in China, they have become the perfect family additions!

For the past two months, we have been greeted every day by two beautiful little balls of fluff, Noodle and Dumpling. Despite not planning on adopting any sort of animal ever, especially in China, they have become the perfect family additions!Dumpling was found all alone in a sports shed at Kev’s school. He was a tiny little bumpkin, but full of dirt and he had fallen through the ceiling of the building. Our friend Candy found him first and took him to a local vet who estimated him to be around 3 weeks old.

The vet gave her some powdered goat’s milk, a feeding syringe and some medicine to nurse him to full strength. Candy couldn’t look after him so after a few minutes of deliberation….Kev sent me this photo and CAN YOU IMAGINE HOW I MELTED!

Kev Feeding Dumpling First Time

His little box became his new home at our house. He loved curling up in an old jumper and settling himself into his new surroundings. We decided to keep Dumpling pretty much instantly!

 We discovered that ICVS, a popular vet surgery in Wangjing, was holding a talk on moving pets out of China. There’s a fair bit of organising to do but it’s definitely do-able and there’s no quarantine period for the UK.

The kitties are too young to move this summer because they haven’t had all their jabs and snips. By next year they’ll be sorted and we’ll take them home with us!

Tiny Noodle and Dumpling Together

ICVS also informed us that Dumpling wasn’t three weeks old as he had all of his teeth. He was more likely 7 or 8 weeks! We had only been feeding the poor bugger milk on the first vet’s instructions so he wasn’t gaining weight like he should have been since we decided on adopting him.

Kev Feeding Dumpling Milk

As his check-up was being done, we wandered over to a room that held three kittens and a mum. We’d discussed adopting another kitten once Dumpling was all jabbed up because we wanted him to learn the proper cat social skills – and there was Noodle waiting for us in that room. He was actually called Simon at the time but we swiftly changed that because…well, Simon the cat doesn’t really have a ring to it!

Noodle Wrapped in Dressing Gown

The mum had given birth to the two other kittens, but Noodle was found in the streets. Someone bought him in to be adopted and luckily, he was able to feed from the mum too. The other two were being advertised as a pair so that left Noods for us!

Noodle Sleeping Between Sofas

We came back the next day after completing a reference check as new adoptive parents, and brought Noodle home. Dumpling had already proved himself to be a chilled out kind of dude so we were happy with that. Noodle – well, he bloody liked to moan in that taxi journey on the way back! He wouldn’t stop crying the whole way, which is understandable but we couldn’t help thinking that we had made a mistake!

Much Bigger Noodle and Dumpling Sleeping on Pillow

Now, Dumpling and Noodle are the perfect pets. They have developed their own personalities, and they are entirely comfortable with us. They’ll snuggle up next to our pillows at night (but this can be incredibly annoying! When they’re tired they like to suck their paws – apparently it’s just a habit? Bloody hell though, at 3am it’s the worst!), and we’ve even taught them to sit whilst waiting for their food and treats.

Cats Eating Dinner

There are so many stray cats in Beijing it’s unbelievable! I’ve since joined two cat adoption groups on WeChat for advice and the number of kittens being found is just ridiculous. Next year, I want to help out a bit more and start fostering some kittens. Most adult strays do just fine – it only takes around two months for them to become fully feral so adopting a cat from the street isn’t really an option.

What would be great is a cat café for stray kittens who are up for adoption! Anyone want to donate the start-up cost and help us run it? 😉


Have you ever adopted a stray? Do you think we made the right decision adopting Dumpling and Noodle? Let us know in the comments below!


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For the past two months, we have been greeted every day by two beautiful little balls of fluff, Noodle and Dumpling. Despite not planning on adopting any sort of animal ever, especially in China, they have become the perfect family additions! For the past two months, we have been greeted every day by two beautiful little balls of fluff, Noodle and Dumpling. Despite not planning on adopting any sort of animal ever, especially in China, they have become the perfect family additions! For the past two months, we have been greeted every day by two beautiful little balls of fluff, Noodle and Dumpling. Despite not planning on adopting any sort of animal ever, especially in China, they have become the perfect family additions!

About Jade Mortimer

Hey, I’m Jade! Currently I’m working in the outback of Australia, planning a an incredible trip across the country in a campervan!! I love a good cuppa and John Travolta is my hero….

5 comments on “Adopting Kittens in China!

  1. Pingback: Inside Beijing's Cutest Cat Café! - Two Tall Travellers

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  3. They’re lovely! I’m from Israel and we also have a crazy amount of cats – and kittens – on the street, which sometimes breaks my heart because I’d love to just take them all in.

    • I know, it’s so hard not to bring them all home! Although last week we did rescue another one and are currently fostering her too! This time it’s only short term though!

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